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Just a place for art references, art advice, pose inspirations, etc.

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Asked by Anonymous

johnleedraws:

Hi!

It’s funny because I’m now back in the classroom, on the other (student) side of things, and I was thinking about this very topic when we were looking at sketches for one of the first projects last week. The class was fixated on a suggestive pose in one of the sketches, and an argument was breaking out on whether it was appropriate or not.

I chimed in that we hadn’t heard the intent behind that particular piece yet, and that we first had to know that before we could offer opinions on whether or not the sketch (or “blueprint”) supported that intent with its subject matter and formal elements.

Here’s the bottom line: critique will always have a degree of subjectivity to it. It is, as a format, a gathering of people offering their opinions about things.

What you should do is treat crit as a “sounding board” (as Marshall puts it). Have a specific plan for what you want out of critique, and steer the discussions appropriately. In illustration, you are usually trying to pointedly convey your intent using a variety of visual vocabulary tools. Ask first what the intent was, and then break down how the image supports (or disputes) that intent.

For example, when I was teaching, I would try to avoid this:

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"So. What do we think about this?"
"I kind of like it."
"Yeah it reminds me of like, cats I would draw when I was a kid."
"Or like, cats on the internet!"
"Totally. Have you seen this cat thing on the internet?"
<30 minutes of conversation about cats on the internet.>

And instead, try for something like this:

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"Who’s cat is this? This is a funny cat."
"It’s mine!"
"What was your intent for this cat drawing?"
"Well, I was trying to do an elegant Chinese-inspired line drawing of a cat stretching and I haven’t ever used a cintiq, so I was also trying that out."
"OK. Well, the line quality could be more elegant— it’s kind of jittery, it’s uniform throughout, and the drawing, while simple, isn’t as simple as it could be, especially when compared to the ink drawings you were referring to. I’ve seen your drawings before though, so you can definitely use this to build on…"
<30 minutes of specific feedback using the drawing as evidence on: artists to look at for spare line drawings, specific tips on how to set up software/hardware, discussions about the technical aspects of drawing clean lines, the importance of observation/using reference, etc.>

The discussions on “why” is the most important driving force in critique. The artists need to know why they are trying to get feedback, and the participants should be able to articulate why a piece makes them respond a certain way. Challenge your classmates— be that kid who is always asking “why?” If they can’t articulate their position in a logical progression, then you should most likely edit their opinion from your notes in crit (and you should always take notes in crit.)

Speaking of notes, here’s a few quick ones:

- Crit should never be a “me vs. them” kind of thing. It doesn’t really benefit anyone to tear someone down in crit for no reason (I only did it when the student was extremely lazy.) 

- Intent and ignorance isn’t a shield for morally questionable work. 

- No one has all the answers.

Crit is a structure that is there to learn and benefit from. The more you can add to it and understand how to use it, the more it will help your (and your classmates) work.


(via johnleedraws)

artrubzow:

If you cant attend life drawing sessions. This is the best thing for you

Let me show you something I recently found : Croquis Cafe!

You get to see models of different colors and shapes in a life drawing setting. They move and breath while posing (breathing like in real life :O) ambient music is playing in the background and you have 1, 2  and 5 minute sessions. I find it very helpful , you should try it.

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(via artrubzow)

anatomicalart:

Let me link Yall’ to this holy grail.
I present to you Character Design Reference
on [Pintrest] || [Tumblr] || [Twitter] || [Facebook] || [YouTube]

I couldn’t even include all of the reference boards this blog contains on this photoset. That’s right! There’s EVEN MORE! There are pages and pages of them! It is an inspiration treasure trove!
Bookmark this link!
Fill your life with inspiration!

artrubzow:

If you cant attend life drawing sessions. This is the best thing for you

Let me show you something I recently found : Croquis Cafe!

You get to see models of different colors and shapes in a life drawing setting. They move and breath while posing (breathing like in real life :O) ambient music is playing in the background and you have 1, 2  and 5 minute sessions. I find it very helpful , you should try it.

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(via artrubzow)

Asked by cyeux-bleus

parkkennypark:

Thanks Cyeux-blues. I really appreciate the kind words.

I think for many of us finding a personal style is an ongoing pursuit. I know for myself I’m always trying to explore different avenues stylistically because I don’t feel like I’m ready to completely solidify — to definitively call something my style. 

The only advice I have is to keep trying as many hats on as possible. Study styles that you find appealing/interesting, and actually mimic them, all the while asking yourself how you might do them differently/better. Maybe it’s taking a style that’s already been done before and just changing one element of it, like doing the line or shapes a different way — or seeing if you can take a simple graphic way of rendering and translating it to a more realistic style, or vice versa. But I think the all of these exercises that you do should be driven by your own curiosity. I think when you start to see personal style is when you as the artist begin to form opinions, whether consciously or unconsciously, about what looks good and what doesn’t.

As time goes on you should begin to see patterns form and these can serve as the basis of your style. At that point, you can decide which of those personal patterns you want to keep consistent in your work and everything else you can continue to play with.

When I look at my own work I don’t necessarily see a very defined style but one thing that I think makes my work cohesive is some of the linework and shapes — but then again it’s hard to be totally objective about your own work.

Anyway, hope that was somewhat helpful!

Best,

K


(via parkkennypark)

babyshoes-neverused:

I stumbled upon a tumblr today that helps writers accurately represent characters with racial / nationalistic / religious / sexual orientation (and so on) differences than their own.

The site allows you to submit your own experiences and/or get into contact with others that have in order to enhance the depiction of characters in your creative writing.

What a great idea!

Diversity Cross Check


(via babyshoes-neverused)

supersonicart:

Supersonic Sponsor: Craftsy’s Free Online Figure Drawing Classes!

I recently got the chance to sit down and try out a few of Craftsy’s free online classes for myself and they really blew me away.  One of those is the exceptional Figure Drawing: An Essential Guide,” a FREE online class.

The class covers all the basics from blocking your drawing, gesture drawing, contour drawing, light and shadows and even creating custom paper among other things.

As a student years ago I had a great deal of trouble with art school and various art lessons but I found Craftsy’s approach to be so much more accessible than I could have imagined and I really am happy to be sharing it here with you.  I truly wish something like this had existed when I was learning art.  I feel that Craftsy is certainly an invaluable tool (the use of the lesson never expires by the way) for any aspiring artist or even professional artists who might be looking to brush up on a few skills.

Feel free to get started yourself by heading over to Craftsy and Register for the Free Figure Drawing Class!

keylimepie:

ectobiolodaddy:

i think ppl should draw smooches more because basically if you can draw a heart you can draw a KISSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

i mean these are simple smooch poses but… they are so fun 2 do *_*

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(Source: elactobuddy)


(via fumuko)

babeobaggins:

darkchocolatecreature:

FOR ALL MY SISTAS HAVING TROUBLE FINDING THE RIGHT SHADE OF FOUNDATION/CONCEALER, THE KEY IS TO KNOW YOUR SKIN TONE AND UNDERTONE. HOPE THIS HELPS :)

More info on artbecomesyou.com

this is extremely important

(Source: darkchocolatecreatures)

aishaneko:

dougforbes:

Inspiration Reference
simple reference tools make a great amount of difference.

the people who make these kind of reference sheets must be gods :T

aishaneko:

dougforbes:

Inspiration Reference

simple reference tools make a great amount of difference.

the people who make these kind of reference sheets must be gods :T

(Source: notaspretty)


(via karmindy)

New Animation Software 「EmoFuri」 Helps Animate Illustrations Instantly!

krmgn:

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E-mote Free Movie Maker, shortened EmoFuri, is a new Windows software released by M2 that helps artists easily animate photoshop illustrations in a 2D-3D style! EmoFuri uses PSD files of character illustrations to animate them.

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EmoFuri is free for download! Try it out here!


(via a-simple-nicknackatory)

couldhavebeenking:

There is no number five.

Helpful links

Seven Hidden Patterns of Successful Storyboards

Perspective in Storytelling

Guide to Panel Variation

Comic Lettering

Wally Wood’s 22 Panel Tips

Camera Angels Tutorial

The most important tip I could ever give towards drawing/creating good comics is to read comics. Good, bad, mediocre, read them all and learn from them.

Webcomics I love :: Nimona | Monsieur Charlatan | Hemlock | Prague Race | Lost Nightmare